We Live In The Past

Immersed in History: Covers and Remixes in Recent South African Art

By Tim Leibbrandt, published on ArtThrob This article aims to look at the spate of South African exhibitions this year (including exhibitions by Kemang Wa Lehulere, Burning Museum, Athi-Patra Ruga and Lizza Littlewort) which have used acts of quotation, reinterpretation and re-presentation to pay homage or offer pointed critique (sometimes both) to previously existing artworks…

Absurdist Painting in South Africa – New Works of Resistance by Lizza Littlewort

Niklas Zimmer Lizza Littlewort’s uncomfortably beautiful paintings embody images that take issue. Frame by frame, these oil-covered boards stage an irreverent counter-narrative to the dominant, conservative (art) historical canon as it is institutionally upheld in present-day South Africa. By détourning[1] the works of ‘household name’ old Dutch masters like Rembrandt, Vermeer and Hals, as well…

Artist’s statement about Dutch works referred to in “We Live in the Past”

Artist’s Statement about Dutch works referred to in We Live in the Past Lizza Littlewort, September 2015. This body of work is inspired by the research I did during my Honours in English Literature, andfurther research towards a Masters on the narratives surrounding the early Cape. This subject has been brilliantly written about by Dr Hedley…

“Deconstruction Site” by Dr Wamuwi Mbao, Sunday Times LifeStyle, 15 Nov 2015

Deconstrution Site: Lizza Littlewort reinterprets Old Masters through sardonic new eyes. by Wamuwi Mbao THIS year the National Arts Festival commemorated satire, a genre of criticism that has always acted as a tocsin against the excesses of power in South Africa. Whether it’s the iconic work of Anton Kannemeyer or the pointedly parodic critique of…

Featured: Lizza Littlewort and the Persistence of History

Lizza Littlewort is acutely cognisant of the past and the tangible hold it has over our present lived realities. Her most recent body of work, We Live in the Past, currently on at 99 Loop until 28th November, is a biting critique of historical amnesia (but not without a sense of humour), and how this…

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